What I’m reading this week

Posted November 19th, 2010 by in

Image credit: Girl With a Satchel


I was quite saddened by the news that journalist Maggie Alderson will no longer be writing her Good Weekend column. While she is one among many other casualties as part of a planned redesign at the Fairfax Media title, Alderson has been immensely popular with readers and will be sorely missed.  Her last column will be published in this Saturday’s (Nov 20) Good Weekend.
Maggie shares with us how she feels about the pending change on her personal blog.

It’s timely then, that Erica Bartle who writes comprehensive media and magazine blog, Girl With a Satchel, should share a story about Maggie this week. Read about Maggie’s thoughts on her time as editor at Cleo, her journey through motherhood and musings on fashion and feminism here.

Australian non-profit, “community powered reporting” news site YouComm News had their first story fully funded this week. Read about it here:  YouCommNews ‘crowdsources’ first project. The story, In Search of Non-Toxic Housing for Health’s Sake, is the first instalment in a series of ten that looks in detail at the lives of individuals suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Many of you might already be aware that I have a particular liking towards Adam Westbrook’s journalism blog. This is because he continues to share valuable and up-to-date information about journalism and is often optimistic about the future of journalism. This week I have found myself going back to a post of his outlining some key approaches to journalism and creating quality work. They include what he refers to as the Four ‘Pr’ qualities for freelance journalists and covers Prolific, Productive, Profound and Provocative approaches to the craft. Most useful for freelance writers out there.

Editors of women’s magazines are rejoicing after the announcement of Prince William’s engagement to Kate Middleton. Magazine sales are expected to soar over the next year because according to Pacific Magazines’ New Idea editor-in-chief Kim Wilson, “Weddings are terrific sellers.” “When you add the royal element, (and) the prince falling for a commoner, (it’s) a great story.” Read about it here.

Image credit: The Age

The Age profiles weather presenter and television personality Livinia Nixon whose hair apparently rates a mention in nearly every article written about her. It seems references to her blonde hair have proven a popular tactic to describe Nixon but this intelligent and down to earth woman dispels any impression of a ‘blonde stereotype’.   She also wonders at what point does one lose the term ‘girl’ in reference to her ‘weathergirl’ title that has stuck for years.  Read more about Livinia Nixon here: That’s weather presenter to you.


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

Why it’s been so quiet on this blog lately…

Posted November 10th, 2010 by in

I thought it was about time to give my neglected blog some much needed attention. You may have noticed that it’s been unusually quiet around here over the past couple of months, and I haven’t posted anything since early September, but have a few very good reasons.

For anyone who is familiar with the Australian university curriculum, they can most certainly tell you that September is indeed one of the busiest periods of the second semester. You’re well and truly in the thick of study mode, working on major research projects and assessments all while trying to keep up to date with weekly class material. Given this was the lead up to the final month of my Masters program, it left me with no other choice than to create a tunnel-vision focus on that finish line which, at the time, never seemed to be anywhere in sight.

While completing the final weeks of my Masters I was offered a contract journalism role with Fairfax Media doing community news reporting. Between my existing day job, some freelance work, and the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity with Fairfax that I could not refuse, I proceeded to work full time while completing what was the most intense semester I have ever experienced. On top of this, my major research project demanded a lot of time which saw me sitting in computer labs at university until unheard of hours in the night editing video presentations and collecting research data only days before deadline. And then turning up to work the next day sleep deprived and zombie-like. Now on the other side of it all, I can happily report that my postgraduate studies are finally out of the way and now resumes the recovery phase. Three weeks afterwards and I am still trying to catch up on sleep!

Having finished what I consider a rather big milestone and personal ambition, it has given me the chance to reflect on the last couple of years when I decided it was time to get serious about this journalism dream of mine. It wasn’t until I took the chance to reflect that I realised just how much I had achieved. Sometimes we get so caught up in the process of working towards goals that we rarely ever find the time to encourage ourselves along the way. At least, this was the case in my situation. Not once did I pat myself on the back, whisper words of encouragement or reward myself for a job well done. I suppose it’s easy to do when trying to remain focused on the end goal.

As one chapter finishes and new and exciting future opportunities present themselves, I want to take the opportunity to reflect on the past two years and share with you some of the important moments (and highlights) that have helped me get to where I am today…

Selection of Article Clippings 2009 - 2010

 

Jan 2009: enrolled in Master of Communication (Journalism) course
Mar 2009: joined Crossfire Magazine editorial team
Jun 2009: completed journalism internship at Geelong Advertiser
Jun 2009: approached Onya Magazine to contribute
Jul 2009: first feature article published with Onya Magazine
Sep 2009: invited to cover Melbourne Spring Fashion Week
Oct 2009: first feature article published in Fashion Journal
Oct 2009: interviewed Australian singer Shannon Noll for Onya Magazine
Oct 2009: invited to cover Frankie Magazine Photo Book launch
Dec 2009: invited to cover Miss World 2010 Victoria Crowning Show
Dec 2009: first feature article published with X & Y Magazine

Feb 2010: continued second year of Masters
Mar 2010: invited to cover L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival
May 2010: media feature article published with Upstart magazine
May 2010: first feature article published with Desktop magazine
Jun 2010: started freelance journalism and copywriting business
Jul 2010: obtained first clients for freelance writing business
Jul – Sep 2010: completed online journalism internship with Desktop magazine
Sep 2010: approached by Fairfax Media and commenced contract journalism role
Nov 2010: completed Master of Communication (Journalism)

Thank you to everyone who has read my writing, shared it with others, passed on constructive criticisms and helpful feedback and supported my work. Without you, my readers, the articles I produce would be a pointless exercise so I cannot begin to express my gratitude.

I may not be a world class journalist or editor of a leading magazine just yet – there is still so much more for me to learn – but with continued dedication to follow my passion I hope to achieve further success in the near future.

And perhaps from here on I should remember to whisper a few words of encouragement to myself along the way.


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

Why it’s been so quiet on this blog lately

Posted November 10th, 2010 by in

I thought it was about time to give my neglected blog some much needed attention. You may have noticed that it’s been unusually quiet around here over the past couple of months, and I haven’t posted anything since early September, but have a few very good reasons.

For anyone who is familiar with the Australian university curriculum, they can most certainly tell you that September is indeed one of the busiest periods of the second semester. You’re well and truly in the thick of study mode, working on major research projects and assessments all while trying to keep up to date with weekly class material. Given this was the lead up to the final month of my Masters program, it left me with no other choice than to create a tunnel-vision focus on that finish line which, at the time, never seemed to be anywhere in sight.

While completing the final weeks of my Masters I was offered a contract journalism role with Fairfax Media doing community news reporting. Between my existing day job, some freelance work, and the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity with Fairfax that I could not refuse, I proceeded to work full time while completing what was the most intense semester I have ever experienced. On top of this, my major research project demanded a lot of time which saw me sitting in computer labs at university until unheard of hours in the night editing video presentations and collecting research data only days before deadline. Now on the other side of it all, I can happily report that my postgraduate studies are finally out of the way and now resumes the recovery phase. Three weeks afterwards and I am still trying to catch up on sleep!

Having finished what I consider a rather big milestone and personal ambition, it has given me the chance to reflect on the last couple of years when I decided it was time to get serious about this journalism dream of mine. It wasn’t until I took the chance to reflect that I realised just how much I had achieved. Sometimes we get so caught up in the process of working towards goals that we rarely ever find the time to encourage ourselves along the way. At least, this was the case in my situation. Not once did I pat myself on the back, whisper words of encouragement or reward myself for a job well done. I suppose it’s easy to do when trying to remain focused on the end goal.

As one chapter finishes and new and exciting future opportunities present themselves, I want to take the opportunity to reflect on the past two years and share with you some of the important moments (and highlights) that have helped me get to where I am today:

Selection of Article Clippings 2009 – 2010

 

Jan 2009: enrolled in Master of Communication (Journalism) course
Mar 2009: joined Crossfire Magazine editorial team
Jun 2009: completed journalism internship at Geelong Advertiser
Jun 2009: approached Onya Magazine to contribute
Jul 2009: first feature article published with Onya Magazine
Sep 2009: invited to cover Melbourne Spring Fashion Week
Oct 2009: first feature article published in Fashion Journal
Oct 2009: interviewed Australian singer Shannon Noll for Onya Magazine
Oct 2009: invited to cover Frankie Magazine Photo Book launch
Dec 2009: invited to cover Miss World 2010 Victoria Crowning Show
Dec 2009: first feature article published with X & Y Magazine

Feb 2010: continued second year of Masters
Mar 2010: invited to cover L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival
May 2010: media feature article published with Upstart magazine
May 2010: first feature article published with Desktop magazine
Jun 2010: started freelance journalism and copywriting business
Jul 2010: obtained first clients for freelance writing business
Jul – Sep 2010: completed online journalism internship with Desktop magazine
Sep 2010: approached by Fairfax Media and commenced contract journalism role
Nov 2010: completed Master of Communication (Journalism)

Thank you to everyone who has read my writing, shared it with others, passed on constructive criticisms and helpful feedback and supported my work. Without you, my readers, the articles I produce would be a pointless exercise so I cannot begin to express my gratitude.

I may not be a world class journalist or editor of a leading magazine just yet – there is still so much more for me to learn – but with continued dedication to follow my passion I hope to achieve further success in the near future.

And perhaps from here on I should remember to whisper a few words of encouragement to myself along the way.


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

What I’m reading this week

Posted September 7th, 2010 by in

It’s all about the future of journalism this week post New News conference.

IN AUSTRALIA:

Margaret Simons, who chairs the Public Interest Journalism Foundation, successfully hosted the New News 2010 conference last week, an event part of the Melbourne Writers Festival. In this piece she documents her experience and gives us a wrap of the event. Read more here.

The future of journalism is looking brighter over at the Walkley Foundation. The federal secretary of the Media Alliance, Christopher Warren, talks about the future of journalism in Australia and unveils new research.

Results from the PANPA awards were announced recently. Take a look at the winners list here.

The Melbourne Press Club is now on Twitter. Make sure you follow them: @MelbPressClub

AROUND THE WORLD:

The paywall debate continues over at Tomorrow’s News, Tomorrow’s Journalists (TNTJ) – a subsidiary of journalism.co.

Quote of the week from the New News conference:

Jack Matthews: People used to come to media because they had to. Now they come to media because they want to #newnews


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

Book Review: Love and Other U-Turns by Louisa Deasey

Posted August 27th, 2010 by in

This article was originally published in Onya Magazine but here I offer you the opportunity to win a copy of the book.

Love and Other U-Turns by Louisa Deasey

Adventure calls in Louisa Deasey’s latest memoir after she meets unlikely comedian Jim at a wacky astrology night and leaves her stable city life to join him on a year-long road trip across Australia. The latte-loving freelance journalist from Melbourne packs up her flat in busy Fitzroy and takes the reader on an intimate journey through one of the biggest risks she has ever taken. With nothing more than her laptop in tow and a supply of low maintenance clothes, life becomes simplified living out of a Mazda travelling through the outback every day. But what more do you want when you realise you have everything you could possibly need to get by, including the love of your life?

The book is particularly interesting for readers with an interest in journalism and freelance writing as the author documents how she filed stories for leading newspapers while on the road, sent emails to editors from “dinosaur-slow” internet cafes in the outback, and even landed a weekly fashion column while bar hopping with comedian Jim. This experience in itself highlights how living and working freelance can be done with very little; Louisa needed nothing more than an internet connection here and there and some solid hours to devote to her writing each week to keep up with the commissions.

And perhaps leaving everything traditional behind in favour of an unpredictable daily lifestyle was just the thing Louisa needed to take her career to the next level. The author shares this view us, both in life and work experiences, describing how “the universe must have liked their lack of desperation” and realising that “not caring too much seems to get you exactly what you need.” Experiences like this seem to shape the author’s thoughts and appear to be exactly what she set out to discover when embarking on this seemingly wild trip. But it’s in times like these that she learns something new about herself including how much she can tolerate, stripped of all the superficial things the fast-paced, technology-driven city life seems to bring with it.

The author describes how she was forced to look inward when she had no possessions or a place to belong to. “I question twenty-nine years worth of habits and values. The fact that up until now, I’ve always needed daily stimulation…” Moments like these flutter in and out of the storyline, offering the reader the opportunity to contemplate how they would feel if placed in a similar circumstance all the while offering subtle, yet fascinating insights into what is a very complex view of life.

The story is an exploration of the balance between needs and wants, passion and security and realising what it really takes to feel content. Set against the backdrop of the harsh Australian outback, where life is often more confronting than in the city, this novel highlights interesting lessons in life and love. But is life on the road enough to keep her away from the true city girl that she is?

Love and Other U-Turns by Louisa Deasey is out now. (Allen & Unwin, RRP $32.99)

To win a copy of this book simply post a comment below that describes your fondest memory of a travel adventure and what you learnt from it. The most interesting and original entry will win. Entries close at 5pm AEST Monday 6 September 2010. Good luck!


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

Journalism in the Digital Age

Posted August 24th, 2010 by in

While this article was originally published in Onya Magazine (on June 8, 2010) I felt it was appropriate to re-visit the piece again given the context of this blog and to demonstrate my ongoing research into the future of journalism and new media.

———————————————————————————————————————————–

As part of their Chancellor’s Lecture series, Swinburne University hosted a seminar on journalism last week. The discussion particularly looked at the future of journalism in the digital age and the challenges that the growth of the Internet and the decline of advertising revenue bring with it. It’s no news to us that the emergence of the digital environment poses a threat to traditional media platforms and the lecture only touched on the ways in which we can embrace and adopt new money making models for the future. Perhaps the conclusion here is that we do not yet know what the future holds. And according to the speakers, the upcoming generation of journalists will carry with them the responsibility to create the new business model from which journalism can continue to flourish.

The lecture Journalism in the Digital Age posed many questions and sparked debate on an issue we don’t necessarily have all the answers to right now. The first speaker, Dr Margaret Simons, challenged the listeners to think about what the public is interested in and how can we cater to the needs of an audience. As an award-winning journalist and the chair of Public Interest Journalism Foundation (PIJF) Simons described the current media model as “broken or under stress” and stated that the once strong relationship between journalism supported by advertising is quickly on the way out. “Publication is not the problem, financing it is,” she said.

L-R: Harris, Simons and Green

Simons believes that it is equally an exciting and frightening time to be involved in journalism. The Internet brings with it new opportunities to experiment with projects and new ways of disseminating information to an audience. “Newspapers have seen revenue move to online sites. And while mainstream media organisations have also set up their own websites, revenue from online advertising cannot sustain high quality journalism. There is, however, no evidence of a declining appetite for news and information. Never before has there been so much media choice, or such need for quality information and debate. Thanks to the Internet, it’s a time of great challenge to journalism, but also freedom and possibility,” she said.

Simons described the current shift of moving into the technological revolution similar to that of the time when the printing press was introduced. Since the technological revolution, We have seen various customer engagement trends that indicate that newer devices are showing less consistent engagement as consumers become more accustomed to the tricks that device makers and brands use to keep them engaged with their devices and services. It changed many ways of doing things but also opened up new possibilities. And this, she claims, is how we should approach the future. Simons predicts that new publications may be smaller and perhaps less profitable and less powerful than the large dominant media organisations in practice today. But these publications will be more intimately connected to their audience, relating to and interacting with them closely.

Simons spoke about a new model of delivering news called YouCommNews by crowd-sourcing funding as a commissioning mechanism. It is based on the same model initiated by the Spot Us project where the public can commission important and overlooked stories and donate money to fund the research, investigating and reporting. Referred to as “community powered reporting” the model is a nonprofit project where contributions are tax deductable and is partnered with news organisations to distribute content under appropriate licenses. This concept reinforces the notion of developing a more direct and collaborative relationship between professional journalists and the audiences they serve. The key question Simons asked in relation to this was “how much will people pay and what will they pay for?”

Jonathan Green, editor of the new ABC online opinion and analysis site The Drum, and former editor of Crikey, also spoke at the lecture. For new media, Green believes that journalism is the thing that has to be sustained because there are great opportunities and qualities in the craft. The challenge is to find that fine balance between delivering news in an effective way to an audience that wants to consume this information. “Paying for content is not necessarily the answer. There are cultural issues in journalism too,” said Green.

Green stated that media models are currently working in a self-serving way. With the rise of the Internet as an interactive medium where journalists can directly communicate and receive feedback from their audience, the power is shifting from big media organisations dictating news to collaborating and responding to the needs and wants of an audience. “Journalism may not be the ‘be all and end all’ of investigating, gathering and disseminating information,” said Green. We have seen examples of this currently at work as crowd-sourced funding indicates the news agenda and when citizen journalists contribute to important items of news. This shift may see a new method in the way journalists work and source their information.

Mr Steve Harris

Former CEO of The Age and senior Fairfax Media and News Ltd executive, Mr Steve Harris, discussed challenges and opportunities for traditional media. He claims that today we have more information than ever before yet we still have a need for credible, trustworthy information. “The digital environment simply fast tracked the pressure question,” he said. The inevitable change was bound to happen sooner or later but he believes that the fundamentals that underpin journalism, and always have, will continue to do so. “As long as there’s a need for good journalism, there’s an opportunity,” said Harris.

Harris posed an interesting question during the session, suggesting that for new media models to be effective, the information delivered will need to do more than what it’s currently doing. “What journalism better helped you understand climate change or any other big issues?” he asked. The need for good journalism in the future, he says, will be to sustain democratic analysis and discover what is relative to an audience and their needs. “The Holy Grail was objectivity. The new Holy Grail is transparency,” he said.

Quality assurance was also a major concern, as amateur citizen journalists and an increasing amount of bloggers enter the digital environment. Harris described comparing the credibility of news sourced from The Australian newspaper, as an example, compared to popular blogs. We know that qualified journalists have researched, written and delivered news to the highest quality possible but can we still expect the same level of credibility with blogs on the Internet? And does the speed of the Internet mean that we are compromising the quality of a well-rounded story? Harris suggested that the problem with the speed of delivering news at such a fast pace simply puts more heat on a topic instead of shedding light on an issue. Does this mean that an audience fails to fully comprehend an issue?

A lot has changed in the media industry for journalists over the past twenty years. Expectations and responsibilities have grown vastly and a different skill set will be required from the journalist of the future. According to Harris, journalism may become more so an “activity” than a “profession”. While Harris agrees that there is a constant search for a new revenue stream, online communities are active and so engagement with them is more direct. In moving forward, journalists will need to encourage audience participation and discussion on any given topic.


To find out more about the Swinburne’s Chancellor Lecture Series, visit: www.swinburne.edu.au/alumni/chancellor_lecture_series/chancellor_lecture_series.htm

Images thanks to Swinburne University Media: www.swinburne.edu.au/mediacentre


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

What I’m reading this week

Posted August 10th, 2010 by in

This is part of a fortnightly series that will give you an insight into some of the key articles and discussions I have been reading and think are worth passing on.

IN AUSTRALIA:

Margaret Simons, who chairs the Public Interest Journalism Foundation, will be part of the team hosting the New News 2010 conference at the upcoming Melbourne Writers Festival this month. She describes the conference as an optimistic look at the future of journalism and media and you can read more about her perspective on the event here

Leading journalist Miranda Devine quits the Sydney Morning Herald to move over to News Ltd, meaning her column will be read by 3 million more readers across Sydney, Melbourne and elsewhere. Read more here

Peter Fray discusses new ways of reporting and how the internet is changing the way news and stories should be written. His take on how print and online can and must work together. Who moved my pyramid?

The Walkleys conference is on this week. Follow their live blog documenting key events and discussions here. Alternatively, follow the conversation through their Twitter account @walkleys.

AROUND THE WORLD:

London based multimedia journalist Adam Westbrook explains the importance of blogging for journalists, including freelance writers: Why journalists must blog and how

South African editors and journalists have spent the past week debating a battle plan in the face of the proposed Protection of Information Bill. There is widespread fear that the Bill is the government’s attempt to clampdown and muzzle media. Read more here.

 

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

“There is no doubt that the past two years have been tough for journalism, and for journalists”– Chris Warren #walkleys

The challenge is to redefine what we think we know about print. We have no ‘do nothing’ option. We do need to change #walkleys


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

What I’m reading this week

Posted August 10th, 2010 by in

This is part of a fortnightly series that will give you an insight into some of the key articles and discussions I have been reading and think are worth passing on.

IN AUSTRALIA:

Margaret Simons, who chairs the Public Interest Journalism Foundation, will be part of the team hosting the New News 2010 conference at the upcoming Melbourne Writers Festival this month. She describes the conference as an optimistic look at the future of journalism and media and you can read more about her perspective on the event here

Leading journalist Miranda Devine quits the Sydney Morning Herald to move over to News Ltd, meaning her column will be read by 3 million more readers across Sydney, Melbourne and elsewhere. Read more here

Peter Fray discusses new ways of reporting and how the internet is changing the way news and stories should be written. His take on how print and online can and must work together. Who moved my pyramid?

The Walkleys conference is on this week. Follow their live blog documenting key events and discussions here. Alternatively, follow the conversation through their Twitter account @walkleys.

AROUND THE WORLD:

London based multimedia journalist Adam Westbrook explains the importance of blogging for journalists, including freelance writers: Why journalists must blog and how

South African editors and journalists have spent the past week debating a battle plan in the face of the proposed Protection of Information Bill. There is widespread fear that the Bill is the government’s attempt to clampdown and muzzle media. Read more here.

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

“There is no doubt that the past two years have been tough for journalism, and for journalists” Chris Warren #walkleys

The challenge is to redefine what we think we know about print. We have no ‘do nothing’ option. We do need to change #walkleys


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and cbd products person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

Journalism on Screen forum

Posted July 27th, 2010 by in

Copyright: Centre for Advanced Journalism

Journalism on Screen forum:
From Print to Broadcast to Blog
– a discussion on the changing times in journalism

Panel lead by: Michael Gawenda (Director at the Centre for Advanced Journalism)

Speakers featured: Jennifer Byrne (ABC TV), Jonathan Green (Editor, The Drum), Evan Williams (The Australian) Sally Warhaft (Social Commentator)

Melbourne celebrated journalism and media at the Journalism on Screen event held in mid July. Combining interesting forum discussions on key issues surrounding the industry, the festival was complemented by a range of films that featured a journalism theme. Key speakers included leading journalists and editors currently working in the Australian media industry and I felt fortunate to attend a forum on the future of journalism (in such turbulent times) that sparked an interesting debate on whether newspapers are dying and if the journalism trade has a future in the face of a growing online environment.

Opening the discussion was a broad question on whether the panellists believed if print has a future. Evan Williams believes newspapers will survive because the history of the medium is so entrenched and the culture is so deep. He agrees that there are many conveniences about print; its portability, permanence and credibility. But he does believe something needs to change. “Newspapers need to produce themselves into a more convenient format,” he said.

Reading a broadsheet while crammed on a bus or train on the way to work is no longer a practical way to receive news. The prevalence of news accessed via smaller electronic devices, such as mobile phones and the likes of the iPad, is fast becoming the norm as people seek updated news that can be delivered to them quickly.

The truth is that technology is here, now. And we need to find ways of taking full advantage of that. The challenge however, lies in the uncertainty of where technology is going to take us and whether we’ll be able to keep up to speed with it. But it’s not all bad news – we simply need to ensure that we embrace the opportunities. Jonathan Green believes it will all come down to the drive of the individuals doing the work. “There will be mechanisms and better ways to access information,” he said. Most panellists agreed that the online environment is a place to obtain information however, it places no influence on the quality of the content. “Online is just a delivery mechanism,” said Jonathan Green.

As editor of ABC’s The Drum, Jonathan Green, has worked across print and, in more recent times, moved across to online media, fulfilling a new demand and new style of reporting. He believes that newspapers served to fulfil a need that once existed and that perhaps there’s no longer a reason to produce print. “We’re seeing the migration… the craft won’t die but the medium might,” he said.  It’s reassuring to hear that the need for journalism will remain but the changes will occur in how it is delivered.

Sally Warhaft, former editor of The Monthly, a national magazine on politics, society and the arts agrees and said newspapers are no longer going to be just “news” papers – they’re going to deliver something more. Perhaps this is why we have seen an increase in feature writing and investigative reporting among newspapers in their effort to offer something extra to their readers, as straight news becomes old quickly in a time where the internet dominates breaking stories.

So where does this leave us? The general consensus was that the craft of journalism still consists of the values it always has. The purpose is still to inform an audience. There are still those same passions to do the job today where reporters talk to people, deal with ideas and make a story out of it. The only difference is that the online sphere has changed the way in which we source and deliver that information. There are now new means to deal directly with people on the ground, at the scene of a story and via interaction online through feedback and comments.

Journalists will be required to work harder but still facilitate between the event and the audience – acting as the translator. Journalists now need to sell themselves in different ways across different platforms in order to get work. “You will need to be your own brand,” said Michael Gawenda, Director at the Centre for Advanced Journalism. It was agreed that it will be important for journalists to do something different to distinguish themselves in the industry.

Despite all the challenges and unanswered questions that lie ahead in the future of the journalism industry, what motivates new/young journalists entering the industry today when the competition is so fierce? Sally Warhaft made a comment in this forum that journalists wanting to enter the industry would be better off seeking work overseas because the opportunities are not available here in Australia. I received no response to this comment when I asked why she believes that is the case. But in an attempt to find an answer, do you believe that there are more opportunities to break into journalism overseas? And if so, which countries are offering these opportunities?

Should we be more optimistic about the opportunities in journalism as we head into the future, aided by technology and new ways to deliver stories?

Your thoughts on this discussion would be greatly received and I welcome you to post a comment below.


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

In the feel and assemble it
The durable enough to enjoy your room The wood surfaces would serve the table allows it To provide an industrial look to the lower metal rivets gives enough to allow more than four people to add a skilled technician
On the lower metal rivets gives enough to its surface There are clearly highlighted to this coffee lovers who want to place different items on the construction is the https://afulltable.com/best-lounge-chair/ as it a simple yet attractive It has a sturdy looking coffee and steel this table

Welcome to my new website!

Posted July 8th, 2010 by in

Copyright Sharon GreenHello and welcome to my new website! This has been part of a developing project over the past three months as I have been working towards launching my own freelance journalism and writing business. Of course, the website is still in its early stages and I’m sure lots of changes are still to come but I thought it was best to launch it now instead of putting it off to a later date.

Those of you who know me know that I am passionate about writing and producing high quality stories of a journalistic nature. I’m about to embark on my final semester at university and am working towards completing a Masters degree specialising in journalism and new media research. So it is here that I will document all things related to media and journalism that I feel are relevant to my studies, research and general interests. I’d also like to use this blog to share my articles with you as they are published, document experiences I encounter in the freelance writing world, and other thoughts or musings.

I welcome you to follow this blog and encourage you to help me spread the word. I recently read in an article posted on Journalism.co.uk that as a freelance journalist, it is important to:

Make everyone you know on earth fully aware that you are a journalist looking for work.

So I will publicly announce, here and now, that I am a freelance journalist available for work and seeking opportunities within the media industry. Tell everyone you know, for the power of word-of-mouth is great. This website is a testament to just that. I’m also keen to connect with like-minded entrepreneurs, writers and journalists via Twitter and welcome new followers to my profile @SharonJGreen.
Until my first official blog post, I welcome you and look forward to interacting with you online.

Sharon


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.