Onya Magazine lends a helping hand

Posted January 20th, 2011 by in

This Australia Day, Onya Magazine and a host of local businesses and organisations will come together at a special event to raise much needed funds for flood devastated Queensland.

More than 75 per cent of Queensland has been declared a disaster zone following a mass down pour of rain of what has been described as the worst flood in over 100 years. The official Queensland flood death toll has risen to 20 and damages to agriculture, mining, infrastructure, tourism and local business is likely to cost the nation $30 billion. While the Queensland Premier’s Flood Appeal has surpassed $127 million, much more will be needed to help recover the state.

This is why Onya Magazine has decided to host the Onya Aid event at Honey Bar on the afternoon of January 26, with 100 per cent of proceeds being donated to the Queensland flood appeal.

Onya Magazine Director and Editor-In-Chief Sandi Sieger said, “Australia is known for its mateship, especially in times of need. When our neighbours are in trouble, Australians step up and that’s what Onya Aid is all about – community and mateship.”

The event will host a silent auction of items from Australian companies, and a live auction at 2pm for big ticket items like a Ken Duncan framed print, athletic memorabilia and more. There will be live music, Byron Cooke spinning disks and Melbourne celebrities and local identities in attendance. Entry to the event is just $5 on the door, with 100% of proceeds from admission, auctions, donations and Honey Bar profits being contributed directly to the cause.

Honey Bar owner Steve Vallas, who has also generously donated his venue and time, said, “Every little bit counts and we are just doing what we can. There is nothing more Aussie than a beer on Australia Day, so why not have a beer with us and help in getting Queenslanders back on their feet.”

For further information, visit: http://www.onyamagazine.com

To donate to The Queensland Premier’s Disaster Relief Appeal, call 1800 219 028 or visit: http://www.qld.gov.au/floods/donate.html

Why it’s been so quiet on this blog lately

Posted November 10th, 2010 by in

I thought it was about time to give my neglected blog some much needed attention. You may have noticed that it’s been unusually quiet around here over the past couple of months, and I haven’t posted anything since early September, but have a few very good reasons.

For anyone who is familiar with the Australian university curriculum, they can most certainly tell you that September is indeed one of the busiest periods of the second semester. You’re well and truly in the thick of study mode, working on major research projects and assessments all while trying to keep up to date with weekly class material. Given this was the lead up to the final month of my Masters program, it left me with no other choice than to create a tunnel-vision focus on that finish line which, at the time, never seemed to be anywhere in sight.

While completing the final weeks of my Masters I was offered a contract journalism role with Fairfax Media doing community news reporting. Between my existing day job, some freelance work, and the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity with Fairfax that I could not refuse, I proceeded to work full time while completing what was the most intense semester I have ever experienced. On top of this, my major research project demanded a lot of time which saw me sitting in computer labs at university until unheard of hours in the night editing video presentations and collecting research data only days before deadline. Now on the other side of it all, I can happily report that my postgraduate studies are finally out of the way and now resumes the recovery phase. Three weeks afterwards and I am still trying to catch up on sleep!

Having finished what I consider a rather big milestone and personal ambition, it has given me the chance to reflect on the last couple of years when I decided it was time to get serious about this journalism dream of mine. It wasn’t until I took the chance to reflect that I realised just how much I had achieved. Sometimes we get so caught up in the process of working towards goals that we rarely ever find the time to encourage ourselves along the way. At least, this was the case in my situation. Not once did I pat myself on the back, whisper words of encouragement or reward myself for a job well done. I suppose it’s easy to do when trying to remain focused on the end goal.

As one chapter finishes and new and exciting future opportunities present themselves, I want to take the opportunity to reflect on the past two years and share with you some of the important moments (and highlights) that have helped me get to where I am today:

Selection of Article Clippings 2009 – 2010

 

Jan 2009: enrolled in Master of Communication (Journalism) course
Mar 2009: joined Crossfire Magazine editorial team
Jun 2009: completed journalism internship at Geelong Advertiser
Jun 2009: approached Onya Magazine to contribute
Jul 2009: first feature article published with Onya Magazine
Sep 2009: invited to cover Melbourne Spring Fashion Week
Oct 2009: first feature article published in Fashion Journal
Oct 2009: interviewed Australian singer Shannon Noll for Onya Magazine
Oct 2009: invited to cover Frankie Magazine Photo Book launch
Dec 2009: invited to cover Miss World 2010 Victoria Crowning Show
Dec 2009: first feature article published with X & Y Magazine

Feb 2010: continued second year of Masters
Mar 2010: invited to cover L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival
May 2010: media feature article published with Upstart magazine
May 2010: first feature article published with Desktop magazine
Jun 2010: started freelance journalism and copywriting business
Jul 2010: obtained first clients for freelance writing business
Jul – Sep 2010: completed online journalism internship with Desktop magazine
Sep 2010: approached by Fairfax Media and commenced contract journalism role
Nov 2010: completed Master of Communication (Journalism)

Thank you to everyone who has read my writing, shared it with others, passed on constructive criticisms and helpful feedback and supported my work. Without you, my readers, the articles I produce would be a pointless exercise so I cannot begin to express my gratitude.

I may not be a world class journalist or editor of a leading magazine just yet – there is still so much more for me to learn – but with continued dedication to follow my passion I hope to achieve further success in the near future.

And perhaps from here on I should remember to whisper a few words of encouragement to myself along the way.


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

Why it’s been so quiet on this blog lately…

Posted November 10th, 2010 by in

I thought it was about time to give my neglected blog some much needed attention. You may have noticed that it’s been unusually quiet around here over the past couple of months, and I haven’t posted anything since early September, but have a few very good reasons.

For anyone who is familiar with the Australian university curriculum, they can most certainly tell you that September is indeed one of the busiest periods of the second semester. You’re well and truly in the thick of study mode, working on major research projects and assessments all while trying to keep up to date with weekly class material. Given this was the lead up to the final month of my Masters program, it left me with no other choice than to create a tunnel-vision focus on that finish line which, at the time, never seemed to be anywhere in sight.

While completing the final weeks of my Masters I was offered a contract journalism role with Fairfax Media doing community news reporting. Between my existing day job, some freelance work, and the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity with Fairfax that I could not refuse, I proceeded to work full time while completing what was the most intense semester I have ever experienced. On top of this, my major research project demanded a lot of time which saw me sitting in computer labs at university until unheard of hours in the night editing video presentations and collecting research data only days before deadline. And then turning up to work the next day sleep deprived and zombie-like. Now on the other side of it all, I can happily report that my postgraduate studies are finally out of the way and now resumes the recovery phase. Three weeks afterwards and I am still trying to catch up on sleep!

Having finished what I consider a rather big milestone and personal ambition, it has given me the chance to reflect on the last couple of years when I decided it was time to get serious about this journalism dream of mine. It wasn’t until I took the chance to reflect that I realised just how much I had achieved. Sometimes we get so caught up in the process of working towards goals that we rarely ever find the time to encourage ourselves along the way. At least, this was the case in my situation. Not once did I pat myself on the back, whisper words of encouragement or reward myself for a job well done. I suppose it’s easy to do when trying to remain focused on the end goal.

As one chapter finishes and new and exciting future opportunities present themselves, I want to take the opportunity to reflect on the past two years and share with you some of the important moments (and highlights) that have helped me get to where I am today…

Selection of Article Clippings 2009 - 2010

 

Jan 2009: enrolled in Master of Communication (Journalism) course
Mar 2009: joined Crossfire Magazine editorial team
Jun 2009: completed journalism internship at Geelong Advertiser
Jun 2009: approached Onya Magazine to contribute
Jul 2009: first feature article published with Onya Magazine
Sep 2009: invited to cover Melbourne Spring Fashion Week
Oct 2009: first feature article published in Fashion Journal
Oct 2009: interviewed Australian singer Shannon Noll for Onya Magazine
Oct 2009: invited to cover Frankie Magazine Photo Book launch
Dec 2009: invited to cover Miss World 2010 Victoria Crowning Show
Dec 2009: first feature article published with X & Y Magazine

Feb 2010: continued second year of Masters
Mar 2010: invited to cover L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival
May 2010: media feature article published with Upstart magazine
May 2010: first feature article published with Desktop magazine
Jun 2010: started freelance journalism and copywriting business
Jul 2010: obtained first clients for freelance writing business
Jul – Sep 2010: completed online journalism internship with Desktop magazine
Sep 2010: approached by Fairfax Media and commenced contract journalism role
Nov 2010: completed Master of Communication (Journalism)

Thank you to everyone who has read my writing, shared it with others, passed on constructive criticisms and helpful feedback and supported my work. Without you, my readers, the articles I produce would be a pointless exercise so I cannot begin to express my gratitude.

I may not be a world class journalist or editor of a leading magazine just yet – there is still so much more for me to learn – but with continued dedication to follow my passion I hope to achieve further success in the near future.

And perhaps from here on I should remember to whisper a few words of encouragement to myself along the way.


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

What I’m reading this week

Posted August 10th, 2010 by in

This is part of a fortnightly series that will give you an insight into some of the key articles and discussions I have been reading and think are worth passing on.

IN AUSTRALIA:

Margaret Simons, who chairs the Public Interest Journalism Foundation, will be part of the team hosting the New News 2010 conference at the upcoming Melbourne Writers Festival this month. She describes the conference as an optimistic look at the future of journalism and media and you can read more about her perspective on the event here

Leading journalist Miranda Devine quits the Sydney Morning Herald to move over to News Ltd, meaning her column will be read by 3 million more readers across Sydney, Melbourne and elsewhere. Read more here

Peter Fray discusses new ways of reporting and how the internet is changing the way news and stories should be written. His take on how print and online can and must work together. Who moved my pyramid?

The Walkleys conference is on this week. Follow their live blog documenting key events and discussions here. Alternatively, follow the conversation through their Twitter account @walkleys.

AROUND THE WORLD:

London based multimedia journalist Adam Westbrook explains the importance of blogging for journalists, including freelance writers: Why journalists must blog and how

South African editors and journalists have spent the past week debating a battle plan in the face of the proposed Protection of Information Bill. There is widespread fear that the Bill is the government’s attempt to clampdown and muzzle media. Read more here.

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

“There is no doubt that the past two years have been tough for journalism, and for journalists” Chris Warren #walkleys

The challenge is to redefine what we think we know about print. We have no ‘do nothing’ option. We do need to change #walkleys


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.

What I’m reading this week

Posted August 10th, 2010 by in

This is part of a fortnightly series that will give you an insight into some of the key articles and discussions I have been reading and think are worth passing on.

IN AUSTRALIA:

Margaret Simons, who chairs the Public Interest Journalism Foundation, will be part of the team hosting the New News 2010 conference at the upcoming Melbourne Writers Festival this month. She describes the conference as an optimistic look at the future of journalism and media and you can read more about her perspective on the event here

Leading journalist Miranda Devine quits the Sydney Morning Herald to move over to News Ltd, meaning her column will be read by 3 million more readers across Sydney, Melbourne and elsewhere. Read more here

Peter Fray discusses new ways of reporting and how the internet is changing the way news and stories should be written. His take on how print and online can and must work together. Who moved my pyramid?

The Walkleys conference is on this week. Follow their live blog documenting key events and discussions here. Alternatively, follow the conversation through their Twitter account @walkleys.

AROUND THE WORLD:

London based multimedia journalist Adam Westbrook explains the importance of blogging for journalists, including freelance writers: Why journalists must blog and how

South African editors and journalists have spent the past week debating a battle plan in the face of the proposed Protection of Information Bill. There is widespread fear that the Bill is the government’s attempt to clampdown and muzzle media. Read more here.

 

QUOTES OF THE WEEK:

“There is no doubt that the past two years have been tough for journalism, and for journalists”– Chris Warren #walkleys

The challenge is to redefine what we think we know about print. We have no ‘do nothing’ option. We do need to change #walkleys


© 2010 Sharon Green. All files, words, content and articles on this site are the intellectual property of the writer and no person is authorised to copy or reproduce the material without the author’s prior consent.